Seed List

Stoke

Lettuce Stoke copyright Petra Suckling

Originally from Stoke, near Rochester in Kent, where the Cheesman family had grown it for 170 years, but this variety probably dates back to before 1840. A compact and trouble-free lettuce, perfect for growing in limited space or in containers. The dark green leaves are crunchy, flavoursome and slightly sweet. Sow to harvest 70 days (approx.)

50 seeds
Lettuce

Augusta Rijnsburger Selection

Onion Augusta Rijnsburger Selection

This medium sized, globe-shaped variety is both early and high yielding. The bulbs have yellowish-brown skin and crisp, aromatic flesh with fine flavour. Also thought to have good storage capability. Let us know what you think of it.

50 seeds
Onion
Organic
Limited Stock

Batun

Onion Batun

This Russian variety forms clumps, similar to multiplier onions, of thumb-sized, purple tinged, crescent shaped bulbs. Sow from spring through until early autumn; this perennial variety can be left in the ground all year round and propagated by allowing to seed (which it will in its second year) or by dividing the clumps. The mild flavoured bulbs are ideal for salads, soups and stir fries.

50 seeds
Onion
Organic
Limited Stock

Blackdown Blue

Pea Blackdown Blue

Originating in northern France, these peas were given to a young soldier returning from the battlefield of the Somme as a memento of happier times before the war. He took them home to Somerset where his family and friends have grown them ever since. The plants will reach around 1.8m in height and produce beautiful bicoloured flowers followed by purple pods packed with flavoursome peas.

10 seeds
Pea
Wrinkled varieties

Blue Prussian

Pea Blue Prussian

A very old variety dating back to at least the end of the 18th century in England. Sutton & Sons Seed and Plant List of 1852 describes it as “a useful old variety”. Thought to have been developed in Germany, though very little is known about its early history. We do know, however, that is was grown by Thomas Jefferson, the 3rd president of the USA, in 1809 in his garden at Monticello, Virginia. Growing to 90-120cm in height, it produces white flowers followed by plump, blunt pods containing 7-8 peas in each. The peas can be used fresh, but are ideal as a drying pea, when the seeds are dark blue-green.

10 seeds
Pea
Round varieties

Born Mangetout

Pea Born Mangetout (flower)

Our donors were given these peas by teacher, Ester Born, from Switzerland, after whom it is named. Ester acquired the variety from a local farmer and it is thought that the variety dates to back to the 1970s. Produces tall plants (2-3m) and beautiful magenta flowers, followed by delicious mangetout peas. It is also winter hardy and can be sown in January/February or as soon as the ground thaws.

10 seeds
Pea
Wrinkled varieties
New this year

Bullroyd Bean Pea

Pea Bullroyd Bean Pea flower

Our donor was given the seed by his neighbour, who in turn had acquired them from a past member of the Bullroyd Allotment Association, Bradford, where the pea had been successfully grown for many years. Dense plants reach 1.5-1.8m in height, producing pink and purple flowers and pods full of large, tasty peas. Guardian Michael Blake enjoyed their “old-fashioned” flavour and found them particularly tasty in a pea and cauliflower curry.

10 seeds
Pea
Wrinkled varieties

Carlin

Pea Carlin

Grown by our donor's family since the 1890s and originally given to his great-grandfather as a wedding present, this ancient variety dates back to the latter half of the 16th century. Protein rich, (about 25%) this classic drying pea is still traditionally eaten in northern England on Carlin Sunday (the Sunday before Palm Sunday). The peas are soaked in brine overnight, boiled and eaten with salt and vinegar or doused in beer or mint sauce. Some say that the day commemorates the arrival of a shipload of peas in besieged Newcastle in 1644, saving many from starvation. Attractive pink and lilac flowers are followed by pods of small, brown mottled peas.

10 seeds
Pea
Round varieties

Dwarf Defiance/John Lee

Pea Dwarf Defiance/John Lee (pods)

Syn. Rentpayer, Strategem. First known as 'John Lee', this variety was bred by Thomas Laxton and introduced by Suttons in 1892 who describe it as “heavy cropping with excellent flavour”. This second early/maincrop variety reaches only around 60cm in height. Produces white flowers followed by dark green pointed pods filled with sweet and tasty peas. Vicki Cooke says, “This pea makes huge pods on tiny plants!” and we're sure you will agree.

10 seeds
Pea
Wrinkled varieties

Forty First

Pea Forty First

Dating back to at least the 1920s, our donor's father and grandfather had grown this pea in Culmstock, Devon for many years. ‘Forty-First’ is a Devonshire expression for something that is really good. Our donor says, “A podding pea. Flowers are bicoloured pale mauve and purple, height 150-190cm.” Some early pods are flecked purple, which eventually disappears. Tasty and sweet enough to eat raw.

10 seeds
Pea
Wrinkled varieties