Seed List

Striped Bunch

Climbing French bean Striped Bunch seeds

A rarity! It is claimed that these beans can be found only in 'one hollow' in Right Beaver Creek, Knott County, Kentucky. Growing to 1.2-1.5m in height, the pale apricot flowers are followed by flat, green pods which are tender and tasty when young. Let us know what you think of this one.

10 seeds
French bean
Climbing
Green varieties

Tamila

Dwarf French bean Tamila seeds

Named after our donor's best friend, this variety originates in the village of Kostilnyky, western Ukraine, an area where traditional crops continue to be grown on a large scale. The plants do show some variability, with some determined to climb, a normal characteristic in this type of local variety. Produces lilac flowers followed by a heavy crop of red-striped, green pods full of pretty pink beans. Best used for drying. 

10 seeds
French bean
Climbing
Coloured varieties
Organic

Trinity

Dwarf French Bean Trinity copyright John Wilson

Our donor originally acquired these black seeded beans in the 1990s from Trinity, Jersey, where the selection had been grown for many years by a local farmer. Seed Guardian Mary Gotts says, “Have found these to be vigorous, sturdy, chunky plants.” Produces semi-dwarf plants (up to 60cm) followed by lilac flowers and yellow, waxy, stringless pods.

10 seeds
French bean
Dwarf
Coloured varieties

Turkey Craw

Climbing French Bean Turkey Craw

Delightfully named, this bean has its origins in the Appalachians. It is said to have been removed from the crop of a dead turkey by a hunter in the nineteenth century, hence the name, though we are a little dubious about this claim! It has multiple stems at the base of the plant and two or three leaders. The white flowers fade to apricot and are followed by green pods. Can be eaten as green beans but also thought to be a good drying bean.

10 seeds
French bean
Climbing
Green varieties
Organic

Val's Bean

Dwarf French Bean Val's Bean copyright Adam Alexander

This variety produces massive plants with large pods and beans, huge foliage and lilac flowers. Their mild, sweet flavour makes them good for eating fresh when young, though they will become stringy if left to mature. The mottled maroon seeds make tasty dried beans.

10 seeds
French bean
Dwarf
Green varieties

Veitch's Climbing

Climbing French bean Veitch's Climbing seeds

Achieved an RHS first-class certificate on its introduction in 1885 and at one time (allegedly) the most widely grown climbing French bean in England. Probably synonymous with Tender & True and Guernsey Runner, neither of which are now commercially available. A good cropper, covered in straight, long, delicious flat pods from top to bottom. Stringless when young, but makes a really attractive and tasty dried bean too.

10 seeds
French bean
Climbing
Green varieties

Williams' Tiger Bean

Climbing French Bean Williams' Tiger Bean copyright David Papillon

Originally passed to our donor's sister by a friend who had in turn been given them in the late 1960s by a retired British War Graves Commission gardener. Produces vigorous, very tall plants; up to 3.5m has been recorded; and curled, green pencil pods with purple 'tiger stripes', which disappear when cooked. The beans themselves have a full, hearty flavour. 

10 seeds
French bean
Climbing
Coloured varieties

Yugoslavian No 4

Dwarf French Bean Yugoslavian No. 4

This bean produces pale cream and white flowers followed by small, flat, green pods that become blotched red when mature. Eat fresh when young, when the pods are really tasty, or allow to dry and use the tan mottled seeds in soups and stews. Prefers a later sowing, is frost tolerant, and matures quickly.

10 seeds
French bean
Dwarf
Green varieties

Gupta's Indian Mustard

Indian Mustard Gupta's Indian Mustard

Although originally from India this has been grown by our donor on the St Mary’s Allotments in Leamington Spa – a multicultural hotch-potch of vegetable growing. It is the most productive of the Indian mustards trialled in our Sowing New Seeds project, producing large, mild-flavoured leaves.

50 seeds
Indian Mustard
Organic

Ragged Jack

Kale Ragged Jack

(Brassica oleracea) Our donor's family had grown this kale for many years. Known as ‘Tunley Greens’, it had originally come from his wife’s grandfather who obtained the seeds in Tunley, Somerset in around 1910. Known in Europe for centuries, it was often grown in cottage and farm gardens. Valued for its hardiness and ability to provide tasty, fresh greens in the depth of winter. Its frilly grey-green leaves have a lovely purple tinge.

50 seeds
Kale
Organic